Have No Fear, Your Compost is in the Clear

 
 https://learningandyearning.com/composting-in-winter

https://learningandyearning.com/composting-in-winter

Hey how we doin’ folks?! We’re most excellent in these parts as winter has arrived and old man Ullr is quickly dressing our mountains white. The season is starting up in full force and we couldn’t be more pumped. With that said our first demo days of the season are coming up at Smugglers’ Notch on December 16th and 17th, so come hang out, try a board, and have the most fun snowboarding you’ve ever had before the fleet is sold out for the year!

Alrighty, this week we’re talkin’ winter composting because it’s that time of the year you’re thinking, “ ah dangit, I’ve spent all spring, summer, and fall creating a most magnificent compost pile, how am I going to make this thing work over the winter?” Trust me, I feel your pain, but I also have some great news for you. Even though it’s going to be mighty cold and you may think there’s no chance in salvaging your work, compost piles, if handled with love, can survive and thrive in the most harsh winter conditions. With winter’s ability to significantly lower the internal temperatures and activity of your compost pile, let’s take a look at some easy remedies.

 http://di-wineanddine.blogspot.com/2013/04/straw-bale-compost-pile.html

http://di-wineanddine.blogspot.com/2013/04/straw-bale-compost-pile.html

Building a makeshift shelter of sorts can be extremely beneficial to heat retention of your compost pile. One example of a simple structure is a hay bale barrier that blocks three sides of your pile, usually with the opening on the least windy side. The bales will block the wind, which will help retain heat in your compost, and at the end of the season you can even compost the hay to get rid of it. To go one step further you can put a roof on that shelter to help shelter from excess precipitation and wind. Don’t go crazy, all I would do is grab a piece of plywood, nail a 2x4 to one length of it, and slap it right on top of the hay bales. I opt for the 2x4 so the surface of the roof is a bit slanted allowing water to run off the side of it instead of letting it sit right on top. You can push snow right down the incline too. In the end you don’t have to go too fancy, sometimes a nice big tarp can do the trick to helping insulate and preventing too much moisture from entering the compost.

 https://suburbanfarmonline.com/2011/01/09/compost-nerd/

https://suburbanfarmonline.com/2011/01/09/compost-nerd/

Another trick, which will helps you control the condition a bit more is just using a large plastic tote and some worms! Keep the tote tucked away somewhere in the house or your garage and use that to create a smaller compost pile inside.  Adding the tote contents to the pile outside when it’s full will also enable to retain the maximum amount of heat it can, giving it a better chance of adjusting to outdoor compost.

That’s it for this week folks, thanks for tuning in! Got any composting tips for the winter yourself? Send ‘em in to Will@powesnowboards and claim your 15 minutes of fame.