“I Don’t Want to Eat Your Fleece…”

Hey folks! How are we doing on this second day of May!? I can safely say I am already sick of these hot temps and all the rain we’ve been getting, and I am ready for winter again. Already counting down the days till I can slide down snow and sleep under 7 blankets at night. Before we get into it, I just want to say thank you to Bolton Valley for letting us hold our 3rd Powe. Mountain Project there, always a pleasure, and boy does that place look clean! Catch us at the next Powe. Mountain Project, hosted by Sugarbush May 11th (more details to come).

Alrighty, this week we’re taking a quick gander at microfibers and how they may end up as a part of your diet. I know, I know, we wear microfibers, we don’t eat them, but hear me out. Microfibers are tiny tiny tiny (hence micro) filaments, strands, strings, whatever you want to call em’s, made out of plastic, that compose many clothes commonly worn today, especially in the outdoor industry. One example of this is fleece. While this synthetic material has allowed us to brave the elements in more efficient and fashionable style, it may also be having some environmental repercussions.

Every time we wash synthetics, whether it be your fleece, mid layers, long johns, socks, towels, whatever, tiny little itty bitty pieces of those fibers break off in the wash. Eventually they make it into our drainage systems and ultimately our waterways and major bodies of water like our oceans. Once in the oceans, it even can eventually wash to shore,  which is what happened and now it is said that “these tiny fibers make up 85% of human debris on shorelines across the globe…”  It’s becoming so much of a problem that microfibers have been found in table salt in China. With that said, it is not unlikely in the least bit that these fibers can find way into the human diet through seafood and other species that rely on marine species. I don’t know about you guys, but I grew up on the ocean and love seafood, so it’s necessary we do something about this, if not for Mother Earth, do it for me. As Rachael Miller from the amazing Rozailia Project puts it best, “I don’t want to eat my fleece, and I don’t want to eat your fleece, and my guess is you don’t want to eat the guy down the hall’s fleece, either.”

Lucky for us, companies like Patagonia and organizations like the Rozalia Project are working with researchers to pinpoint exactly what effects are happening from the amount of microfibers floatin’ around out there. If you aren’t familiar with the Rozalia Project please please please go check them out, they are a huge inspiration for our Powe. Mountain Project, and cool people.

I got a little off topic there, but I guess the moral of today’s Green Tip Tuesday is to wear less synthetics if possible, or at least be conscious of how you’re washing your garments. Thanks for catching up everyone, enjoy the week!

Microfiber illustration. Source: Laszlo Kubinyi, Outsideonline.com

Microfiber illustration. Source: Laszlo Kubinyi, Outsideonline.com

www.solucoesindustriais.com

www.solucoesindustriais.com

https://www.trustedclothes.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Pollution_grande.jpg

https://www.trustedclothes.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Pollution_grande.jpg